Journal of Family Medicine and Primary Care

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2019  |  Volume : 8  |  Issue : 7  |  Page : 2312--2317

Factors affecting adherence to antiepileptic medications among Sudanese individuals with epilepsy: A cross-sectional survey


Muaz A Elsayed1, Nuha Musa El-Sayed2, Safaa Badi3, Mohamed H Ahmed4 
1 Department of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Omdurman Islamic University, Omdurman Teaching Hospital, Khartoum, Sudan
2 Department of Neurology, Omdurman Teaching Hospital, Khartoum, Sudan
3 Department of Clinical Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Omdurman Islamic University, Khartoum, Sudan
4 Department of Medicine and HIV Metabolic Clinic, Milton Keynes University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Eagelstone, Milton Keynes, Buckinghamshire, UK

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Muaz A Elsayed
Department of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Omdurman Islamic University, Omdurman Teaching Hospital, Khartoum
Sudan

Background: Nonadherence to medication is widespread in epilepsy and other chronic diseases. Studies reporting adherence to antiepileptic medications are very limited in African countries. Adherence reports from low income African countries are few in contrast to multiple studies from high-income countries. Therefore, the aim of this study is to measure the level of adherence to antiepileptic medication in Sudanese population. Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study of 96 individuals with epilepsy recruited from neurology outpatient clinics in three tertiary centers in Sudan. Data were collected by using a structured questionnaire containing Morisky Medication Adherence Scale-4 (MMAS-4) and Belief about Medication Questionnaire and analyzed by statistical package of social sciences. Results: About 35% of patients were estimated to be nonadherent. Most of the patients (93%) acknowledged their need for antiepileptic drugs. However, 35% had high concern score. Adherence is affected by attitude toward antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) and presence of side effects to AEDs. The relation between side effects and adherence was significant (P value 0.000). Furthermore, there was a statistically insignificant relation between the number of drugs used and adherence (P value 0.002). There was a significant relation between adherence, necessity mean score, concern mean score, and necessity concern differential P value 0.000 for all. Conclusion: Nonadherence to antiepileptic medication was reported in almost in one third of individuals in this cohort. There were statistically significant associations between nonadherence and both side effects and number of medications used in the treatment of epilepsy. Therefore, family physician should always check compliance with antiepileptic medication. Patient's education about adherence to medication through family physician may in part decrease the recurrence of epileptic seizures. Further research is needed to explore ways to increase adherence with AEDs in a low resource country like Sudan.


How to cite this article:
Elsayed MA, El-Sayed NM, Badi S, Ahmed MH. Factors affecting adherence to antiepileptic medications among Sudanese individuals with epilepsy: A cross-sectional survey.J Family Med Prim Care 2019;8:2312-2317


How to cite this URL:
Elsayed MA, El-Sayed NM, Badi S, Ahmed MH. Factors affecting adherence to antiepileptic medications among Sudanese individuals with epilepsy: A cross-sectional survey. J Family Med Prim Care [serial online] 2019 [cited 2021 Jun 20 ];8:2312-2317
Available from: https://www.jfmpc.com/article.asp?issn=2249-4863;year=2019;volume=8;issue=7;spage=2312;epage=2317;aulast=Elsayed;type=0