Journal of Family Medicine and Primary Care

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2015  |  Volume : 4  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 514--518

What are we drinking? Assessment of water quality in an urban city of Punjab, India


Amanjot K Singh1, Vikram Kumar Gupta2, Bhuvan Sharma3, Bhavna Singla4, Paramjeet Kaur5, Geeta Walia4 
1 Department of Community Medicine, MMIMSR, Mullana, Ambala, Haryana, India
2 Department of Community Medicine, Dayanand Medical College and Hospital, Ludhiana, India
3 Department of Community Medicine, PIMS, Jalandhar, India
4 Department of Microbiology, GMC, Patiala, India
5 Department of Community Medicine, GMC, Patiala, India

Correspondence Address:
Amanjot K Singh
Department of Community Medicine, MMIMSR, Mullana, Ambala, Haryana
India

Introduction: Ground water is the ultimate and most suitable fresh water resource for human consumption in the urban areas of India. Studies regarding ground water quality have shown that the higher rate of exploration as compared to the rate of recharging, inappropriate dumping of solid, as well as liquid waste, lack of strict enforcement of law has led to the deterioration of ground water quality. The present study was thus, carried out to evaluate physicochemical, as well as a microbiological profile of tap water, and filtered water in urban areas of Patiala, Punjab. Materials and Methods: The three zones under Municipal Corporation and two areas under Public Health Department were chosen according to the simple random sampling from Patiala city. From each area, 10 houses were chosen according to the systematic random sampling technique (n = 50). Water was taken from two sources, tap water, and from the water filter. Two samples were taken from each source one for the physicochemical analysis and another for bacteriological analysis. The samples which were sent for bacteriological assessment were collected in a sterile container. Results: The number of water samples found to be within desirable limits with respect to physicochemical parameters were significantly more with the filter water sample than the tap water samples. Suspicious/unsatisfactory microbiological quality of water was observed in 28% and 4% of tap and filter water samples, respectively. Conclusion: The results indicate that certain chemical parameters such as hardness, chloride, and fluoride levels were beyond the permissible limits. Therefore, we recommend that home filters should be installed, serviced appropriately, and their water quality should be checked routinely. Also, any leak from sewage pipes should be promptly repaired to prevent contamination of drinking water.


How to cite this article:
Singh AK, Gupta VK, Sharma B, Singla B, Kaur P, Walia G. What are we drinking? Assessment of water quality in an urban city of Punjab, India.J Family Med Prim Care 2015;4:514-518


How to cite this URL:
Singh AK, Gupta VK, Sharma B, Singla B, Kaur P, Walia G. What are we drinking? Assessment of water quality in an urban city of Punjab, India. J Family Med Prim Care [serial online] 2015 [cited 2021 Apr 11 ];4:514-518
Available from: https://www.jfmpc.com/article.asp?issn=2249-4863;year=2015;volume=4;issue=4;spage=514;epage=518;aulast=Singh;type=0