Journal of Family Medicine and Primary Care

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2014  |  Volume : 3  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 29--32

Psoriasis and psychiatric morbidity: a profile from a tertiary care centre of Eastern India


Somenath Sarkar1, Arnab Sarkar2, Revanta Saha1, Tanusree Sarkar3 
1 School of Tropical Medicine, Kolkata, India
2 The Institute of Post-Graduate Medical Education and Research, Kolkata, India
3 Burdwan Medical College, West Bengal, India

Correspondence Address:
Somenath Sarkar
Barsul, Burdwan - 713 124, West Bengal
India

Context: Psoriasis has an impact on psychology of the patients. There is a dearth of studies regarding this field in eastern India. Aims and Objectives: The primary objective of this study is to evaluate the psychiatric morbidity in psoriasis and secondary objective is to assess the morbidity in all eight dimensions of psychosocial and physical aspects, i.e. cognitive, social, discomfort, limitations, depression, fear, embarrassment and anger. Settings and Design: Institutional based case control study. Materials and Methods: Forty-eight patients of psoriasis and equal number of healthy controls were included in the study. Self-reporting questionnaire-24 (SRQ-24) and skindex (A 61-item survey questionnaire) were used to assess the psychiatric morbidity in both groups. Statistical Analysis Used: DQMedCalc version 10.2.0.0DQ (by Acacialaan 22, B-8400, Ostend, Belgium) was used as statistical software. Chi-square test was used as a test of significance. Results: The SRQ assessed psychiatric morbidity in the study group was 62.5%, compared with 18.5% in the control group. This difference was statistically significant (P < 0.001). Guttate psoriasis had maximum association with psychiatric morbidity (100%), followed by plaque type (63.6%) and palmoplantar type (42.8%). According to the skindex, the most common psychiatric morbidity in psoriasis patients was anger (58.3%), followed by discomfort (52.08%), social problem (52.08%), cognitive impairment (50%), embarrassment (50%), physical limitation (47.91%), fear (47.91%) and depression (43.75%). The skindex observed psychiatric morbidity among the case and control group was statistically significant for all the parameters (P < 0.0001). Conclusion: Psoriasis has a high degree of psychiatric morbidity and the extent of this co-morbidity is even greater than hitherto thought of.


How to cite this article:
Sarkar S, Sarkar A, Saha R, Sarkar T. Psoriasis and psychiatric morbidity: a profile from a tertiary care centre of Eastern India.J Family Med Prim Care 2014;3:29-32


How to cite this URL:
Sarkar S, Sarkar A, Saha R, Sarkar T. Psoriasis and psychiatric morbidity: a profile from a tertiary care centre of Eastern India. J Family Med Prim Care [serial online] 2014 [cited 2021 Apr 12 ];3:29-32
Available from: https://www.jfmpc.com/article.asp?issn=2249-4863;year=2014;volume=3;issue=1;spage=29;epage=32;aulast=Sarkar;type=0