Home Print this page Email this page Small font size Default font size Increase font size
Users Online: 396
Home About us Editorial board Search Ahead of print Current issue Archives Submit article Instructions Subscribe Contacts Login 
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2021  |  Volume : 10  |  Issue : 8  |  Page : 3076-3083

Dietary habits, diversity, and predictors among pregnant women attending primary health care centers for antenatal care in Lagos, Nigeria


1 Department of Community Health and Primary Care, College of Medicine, University of Lagos, Idi-Araba, Lagos, Nigeria
2 Department of Community Health and Primary Health Care, Lagos State University, College of Medicine, Ado Ekiti, Nigeria
3 Department of Community Medicine, Ekiti State University, Ado Ekiti, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Foluke A Olatona
Department of Community Health and Primary Care, College of Medicine, University of Lagos, Idi-Araba, Lagos
Nigeria
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jfmpc.jfmpc_397_21

Rights and Permissions

Background and Aim: Inadequate nutrition during fetal development resulting from poor dietary habits leads to reprogramming within fetal tissues and poses as a risk factor for non-communicable diseases in later life. This study was conducted to determine the dietary habits, diversity, and predictors among pregnant women in Lagos, Nigeria. Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted using a structured interviewer-administered questionnaire to obtain data from pregnant women attending primary health care centers in Lagos, Nigeria. A multistage sampling method was used to select 350 pregnant women. A food frequency questionnaire was used to assess the dietary habits while dietary diversity was measured using non-quantifiable 24-hour recall. Data were analyzed using Epi-Info version 7.2 computer software. Chi-square and t-test were used to test for associations and P value < 0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. Results: Only 16.7% of respondents consumed five servings of fruits and vegetables daily while the rice was the most frequent meal taken (45.4%). Meat was the commonest animal protein (20.3%) and only 30.8% had a high dietary diversity score (DDS). High DDS was significantly associated with parity of 1–3, living in a duplex or detached house, completion of at least secondary school education, and highly skilled professionals. Conclusion: Healthy dietary habits and high DDS were low and associated with low parity and higher socio-economic status. Nutrition intervention that encourages higher dietary diversity is needed especially among women of higher parity and lower socioeconomic status in Lagos.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed314    
    Printed2    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded29    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal