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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2021  |  Volume : 10  |  Issue : 8  |  Page : 2993-2997

Effectiveness of an institutional COVID.19 central sampling team during pandemic at a tertiary care centre


1 Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head-Neck Surgery, All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), New Delhi, India
2 Department of Internal Medicine, All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), New Delhi, India
3 Department of Gastroenterology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), New Delhi, India
4 Department of Biostatistics, All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), New Delhi, India
5 Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), New Delhi, India
6 Centre for Community Medicine, All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), New Delhi, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Arvind Kumar
Department of Internal Medicine, All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), New Delhi
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jfmpc.jfmpc_63_21

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Background: An efficient sampling is one of the key methods to identify all those affected by coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Objectives: To analyze how efficient setting up of a central sampling team would be to prevent any outbreak within the institution by minimizing the movement of suspected COVID-19 patients admitted in the inpatient wards. The secondary objective was to train maximum resident doctors to collect samples of admitted patients. Methodology: A central sampling team comprising of resident doctors from various departments was made who did sampling of the suspected COVID-19 inpatients admitted under various specialties. Results: There were a total of 341 patients [209 males (61.29%), 132 females (38.7%)] and 335 patients underwent sampling. There was a positive correlation between: (1) number of calls from a department vs percentage of positive samples in that department [Pearson correlation coefficient (R) = 0.47; P = 0.026], (2) number of samples taken by resident of a particular department from central sampling team vs number of positive samples taken by resident of that department [R = 0.8739, P = 0.01] and (3) number of visits to a department vs number of residents trained in that department [R = 0.93; P = 0.00001]. Conclusion: Formulation of a central sampling team led to changes like a separate donning and doffing area in each ward and training of many resident doctors posted in different wards. This made each ward self-sufficient in collection of samples. This venture also ensured minimal movement of suspected COVID-19 patients in the hospital and thus least exposure to the hospital staff.


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