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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2021  |  Volume : 10  |  Issue : 8  |  Page : 2915-2922

A cross sectional study to assess tobacco use and its correlates among patients attending non-communicable disease clinics of a Northern Jurisdiction in India


1 Department of Community Medicine and School of Public Health, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER), Chandigarh, Punjab, India
2 Department of Psychiatry, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER), Chandigarh, Punjab, India
3 Department of Health and Family Welfare, State Tobacco Control Cell, Punjab, India
4 Department of Health and Family Welfare, State NCD Control Cell, Punjab, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Sonu Goel
Department of Community Medicine and School of Public Health, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER), Chandigarh
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jfmpc.jfmpc_2471_20

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Background: Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs) continue to rise unabated globally and the existing evidence has unequivocally established the relationship between tobacco use and NCDs. In 2010 the Government of India (GOI) introduced NCD clinics under the National Program for Prevention and Control of Cancer, Diabetes, Cardio Vascular Diseases and Stroke (NPCDCS) with the purpose of preventing and combating the NCD epidemic. This study was undertaken with an objective to comprehensively determine tobacco use and its correlates among patients attending these NCD clinics. Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out among 1172 patients attending NCD clinics at district level, in Punjab, India between May to October 2018. Using systematic sampling every fourth patient was interviewed and equal numbers of visits were made to both the clinics. Results: Overall, the current tobacco use in any form was reported to be 10.2% among the study respondents. Majority of the tobacco users were males (23.3%), in 40–49 year age group, (18.7%), residing in urban area (15%), educated up to secondary school (18%) and non-government occupation bracket (27.4%) and hypertension disease category (41.6%). More SLT users had thought of quitting in past in comparison to smokers (46.6% vs 40%) and had higher quit attempts in past (42.5% vs 38.3%). In the binary logistic regression analysis, odds of tobacco use increased with increasing age, three times higher among participants who were employed (OR 3.75; CI 1.41-10.02),6 times higher in COPD disease category (OR 6.88; CI 2.1-20.59). Conclusion: Higher tobacco use among the NCD clinic attendees with increasing age predisposes them to develop grave complications. This calls for the need to administer intensive behaviour change interventions for tobacco cessation at the existing NCD clinics. This could further strengthen existing health systems and thereby improving health outcomes followed by achieving Sustainable Development Goals.


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