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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2021  |  Volume : 10  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 850-858

Knowledge, attitude, and practice study on animal bite, rabies, and its prevention in an urban community


1 Department of Community Medicine, Tagore Medical College and Hospital, Rathinamangalam, India
2 Department of Community Medicine, Sree Balaji Medical College and Hospital, Chrompet, Chennai, India
3 John and Jenner Center for Research, Erode, Tamil Nadu, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Chinnaian Sivagurunathan
Department of Community Medicine, Tagore Medical College, and Hospital, Rathinamangalam, Chennai, Tamil Nadu
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jfmpc.jfmpc_1674_20

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Introduction: Rabies is a neglected zoonotic tropical disease that usually affects the poorest communities. Rabies is 100% fatal and at the same time 100% preventable. A huge proportion of death due to rabies occurs in Asia and Africa, and India is reported to have the highest incidence of rabies. Aims: To assess the knowledge, attitude, and practice related to animal bites, rabies, and its prevention and utilization of health services for this purpose in the study population. Methods: A community-based cross-sectional study done in an urban area among the age group 20 and above of both gender to assess and statistically highlight the knowledge, attitude, and practice related to animal bites, rabies, and its prevention and utilization of health services for this purpose in the study population. The sample size was estimated to be 350 and a simple random sampling technique was used for the selection of samples. Results: About 76% had heard about rabies. Among them only 63.5% knew it is a fatal disease, only 37.6% knew animals other than dogs can also cause rabies, only 37.3% of the study participants knew about appropriate first aid. Only 37.5% of the animal bite victims washed their wound with soap and running water and 35% had a full course of vaccination. Education had been an important factor that created a significant difference in the knowledge level of the participants. Conclusions: Improved community awareness, forestalling animal rabies, and better access to affordable and potent human rabies vaccines are essential for the elimination of human rabies.


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