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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2021  |  Volume : 10  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 443-448

Burnout and its correlates among nursing staff of intensive care units at a tertiary care center


1 Department of Pediatrics, Pramukhswami Medical College, Bhaikaka University, Karamsad, Anand, Gujarat, India
2 Department of Critical Care, Pramukhswami Medical College, Bhaikaka University, Karamsad, Anand, Gujarat, India
3 Department of Psychiatry, Pramukhswami Medical College, Bhaikaka University, Karamsad, Anand, Gujarat, India
4 Department of Central Research Services, Pramukhswami Medical College, Bhaikaka University, Karamsad, Anand, Gujarat, India
5 Department of Neonatology, Pramukhswami Medical College, Bhaikaka University, Karamsad, Anand, Gujarat, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Archana Sinha
Intensivist, Department of Critical Care, Shree Krishna Hospital, Karamsad, Anand, Gujarat
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jfmpc.jfmpc_1651_20

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Background: Burnout syndrome has been widely reported in nursing staff. It is more pronounced in intensive care setting (up to 80%). This survey was designed to assess the prevalence of burnout and its correlates among critical care nurses. Methods: Anonymous questionnaire was distributed to all ICU nursing staff of a tertiary care teaching hospital. Questionnaire had 25 questions covering – demography, job characteristics, Visual Analogue Scale for stress, co-worker support, work–life balance, question for measuring burnout, job satisfaction, turnover intention, organizational commitment, for depression screening and psychosomatic symptoms. The burnout scale score was used to dichotomize into low burnout (<3) or high burnout (> = 3) group. These two groups were compared using Chi-square test, Fischer's exact test for categorical variables and independent t-test for continuous variables. Significant variables were entered in multivariate logistic regression analysis. Results: Out of 150 ICU nurses, 125 (83.3%) gave completely filled questionnaires which were evaluated. 47 (37.6%) participants reported experiencing high burnout. Binary logistic regression model revealed that lack of specialized ICU training (OR = 4.28, 95% CI: 1.62 to 11.34, P = 0.003), performing extra duty in last month (OR = 5.28, 95% CI: 1.90 to 14.67, P = 0.001), High physical symptoms in last 12 months (OR = 4.73, 95% CI: 1.56 to 14.36, P = 0.006) and mid-level experience (1–5 years) were significantly associated with burnout. Conclusions: Burnout is significantly prevalent (37.6%) among intensive care nurses. Specialized training and limiting work hours can help in mitigating this problem. High frequency of physical symptoms could be early indicators of burnout.


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