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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 9  |  Issue : 9  |  Page : 4942-4948

Emotional intelligence and perceived stress among undergraduate students of arts and science colleges in Puducherry, India: A cross-sectional study


1 Department of Preventive and Social Medicine, Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research, Puducherry, India
2 Aromyx Inc., Sunnyvale, California, USA
3 Department of Psychiatry, Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research, Puducherry, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Mahalakshmy Thulasingam
Department of Preventive and Social Medicine, Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research, Puducherry
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jfmpc.jfmpc_823_20

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Background: The concept of emotional intelligence has gained great popularity in the last few decades. With significant rise in stress and other emotional disturbances among students, it becomes necessary to determine whether high emotional intelligence could help manage perceived stress better. This study aims to assess emotional intelligence and perceived stress among undergraduate students of Arts and Science colleges, to determine the association of emotional intelligence with perceived stress, academic performance, and selected socio-demographic factors. Methods and Material: Using multistage sampling, 720 students aged 18 years and above were selected from four colleges in Puducherry. Emotional intelligence and perceived stress were assessed using standard self-administered questionnaires “The Schutte Self-Report Emotional Intelligence Test (SEIT)” and “Perceived Stress Scale (PSS-14),” respectively. Results: The median (IQR) Emotional Intelligence score and Perceived Stress score were 127 (114–137) and 43 (39–47), respectively. The study was not able to establish a significant association between emotional intelligence and perceived stress. A weak significant correlation existed between emotional intelligence and academic performance. Multiple variable analysis revealed gender, year of study, volunteering with youth organizations, and mother's occupation to be significantly associated with emotional intelligence (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Women, final year students and those who volunteered with youth organizations had higher emotional intelligence. Children of mothers who were employed in knowledge-intensive occupations were more emotionally intelligent. Academic performance had a weak positive significant correlation with emotional intelligence.


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