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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 9  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 1981-1985

Perception and simplified question for assessing problems sleeping among university students at a primary care unit


1 Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, Thailand
2 123 Primary Care Unit, Family Practice Department, Division of Nursing, Srinagarind Hospital, Khon Kaen, Thailand

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Varisara Luvira
Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen
Thailand
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jfmpc.jfmpc_1206_19

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Introduction: Students entering university undergo various lifestyle changes, many of which may affect their sleeping habits. This study aimed to evaluate 1) individual perception of the problems sleeping, 2) "actual" problems sleeping as detected using a simplified questionnaire, 3) the relationship between individual perceptions and actual problems sleeping, and 4) the factors affecting the problems sleeping. Methods and Material: This was a descriptive study of 240 university students who attended the "123 Primary Care Unit" for no sleep-related problems between March and June 2019. The tool was a self-response questionnaire that assessed the respondent's demographic data and sleep patterns over the past year. All parameters and problems sleeping were analyzed for their association. Results: Most of the students (51.3%) perceived themselves as having problems sleeping. Actual problems sleeping was found in 174 (72.5%) students. Individual perception was significantly related to the presence of all four of the problems sleeping assessed, which included difficulty in initiating sleep, waking up at night and being unable fall back to sleep, the need for daytime napping, and the feeling that one is sleep deprived (P < 0.05). Conclusions: This study provides a simplified method for assessing problems sleeping among university students at a primary care facility. Most of the students had problems sleeping and accurate perceptions of those problems sleeping, but the problems sleeping were often ignored. Further improvements to the system for screening and treating problems sleeping are required.


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