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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 9  |  Issue : 12  |  Page : 6186-6193

Challenges to lifestyle modification of chronic disease patients attending primary health care centers in Riyadh


1 The Health Promotion and Health Education Research Chair, Department of Family and Community Medicine, College of Medicine, King Saud University Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
2 Department of Family and Community Medicine, Student, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

Correspondence Address:
Prof. Sulaiman A Alshammari
Department of Family and Community Medicine, College of Medicine, King Saud University Medical City, P.O. Box 2925, Riyadh - 11461, Riyadh
Saudi Arabia
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jfmpc.jfmpc_1037_20

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Background: The rate of chronic diseases is increasing due to the global pandemic of inactivity and an unhealthy diet. Objective: We aimed to determine the dietary habits, physical activities of the participants, and challenges facing them to adapt to a healthy lifestyle. Methodology: The researchers conducted a cross-sectional study on chronic disease patients attending primary health care centers in Riyadh from January to March 2018. The estimated sample size was 250 patients. The participants completed a self-administered questionnaire. Result: The mean age of the 250 participants was 35.3 years old. The Overweight and obese participants accounted for 67.2% of the sample (mean BMI = 28.0). Two-thirds of the participants depend mainly on rice or pasta for their diet, and 48.4-52.0% eat fruits and vegetables less than three times a week. About 50% of the participants perceived a lack of information, skills, motivation, and family or friends support as a barrier to a healthy diet. Also, (56.4%) of males and (67.8%) of females are physically inactive. Accessibility, cost, and the hot climate were physical activity obstacles in more than 60% of the respondents. Optimal BMI showed a significant association with increased physical activity P = 0.04. Conclusion: Physical inactivity and consuming a non-balanced diet are common. So awareness campaigns of the benefit of a healthy lifestyle besides increasing physical exercise facilities, installing environmental changes, and subsidizing sports gyms would encourage people to be more physically active.


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